click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN 13
SFGTV2 12
SFGTV 11
KPIX (CBS) 9
MSNBCW 9
KTVU (FOX) 8
MSNBC 7
CSPAN2 6
KQED (PBS) 6
CNNW 5
KNTV (NBC) 5
CNN 4
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 140
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)
written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
civil rights to the forefront of that year's presidential campaign. a gunman would assassinate reverent king then two months later, robert f. kennedy was shot and killed on the night he won the california primary. george watson brought us this report back in 1988. 20 years after the king assassination. >> like anybody i would like to live a long life, longevity has its place. but i'm not concerned about that now. i just want to do god's will. and he's allowed me to go up to the mountain, and i've looked over and i've seen the promise land. i mean i'll get there with you. but i want you to know tonight, that we as a people will get to the promise land. >> reporter: the preacher became the prophet. while standing in tennessee, martin luther king's words rang horribly true. a single gunshot would kill the leader. the shot came from over there. fired from a tiny room it tore into the body of the entire country. rioting broke out. blacks bellowed out theirager in a fire storm of anger and frustration. all this triggered by the murder of a man who preached that freedom would come through nonv
the san francisco civil rights ordinance. i am tiny [inaudible] and my comments are on behalf for a safe san francisco. as you know the coalition worked to address accountability and transparency and san francisco police department relationship with federal counter terrorism agencies and one that we worked on is within the san francisco police department between the federal bureau of investigation in the joint task force. as part of that relationship sfpd entered into a secret agreement with the fbi that did away with decades of progress in san francisco. members of this coalition have worked with supervisor jane kim's office to pass this ordinance and make sure that local and state standards apply and requires transparency in the process and that the chief issue a report on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we
've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the country, we have seen too many school districts, quite frankly, that have been slow to respond. and that is why we have to come together like this. that is why we have to get out of our lane and understand that we've
.s. attorney. we talk about fraud and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this is
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
honoring civil rights leader, drf. martin luther king junior. he played a significant role in advancing african - american and human rights through non- violence and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his assasination in 1968. for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual freedom train for >> reporter: long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday tribute to the late civil rights leader. hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going history lesson. >> we listened to his speech. it was pretty amazing and i feel very inspired. >> i do not know about anybody else but i think it was great. >> reporter: the freedom train picked up momentum and more passengers in palo alto as it rolled on north tow
the alabama civil civil rights march. >> this is for all americans. to get out and enjoy this day and to celebrate and remember the struggles that we all have been through. [ singing ] >> reporter: hundreds of people join said them for a mile and a half march to the gardens. >> celebrating dr. king and celebrating community. that is important. >> reporter: more than a thousand people attended prayer services services and presentations on the life of dr. king. she knew and marched with dr. king. >> very, very nice. he was a wonderful person. wonderful person. non-violent. turning of the cheek. >> reporter: she was one of many african americans turned away that voting both. joining a dangerous protest march. she marched with dr. king on the civil rights march. >> very, very scary and a memorable experience that just doesn't go away. >> reporter: many people said a lot changed but more needs to change. reporting live in san francisco, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> 49er head coach jim harbaugh had a lot to say today, we will let you hear what he is not looking forward to when he
that brought them closer to the action than ever. >>> honoring the civil rights leader by hopping on a train, more on that, where that train is going and how you can ride. [ telephone rings ] good evening this is flo. [laughs] yes, i'm that flo. aren't you sweet! licensed phone-ups available 24/7. call 1-800-progressive. >>> good morning, b.a.r.t. is back on time. it was a quick turn around. we could gotten word that may they be experiencing major b.a.r.t. delays. they were dealing with a slight computer problems problem. we just -- problem. they were able to resolve the computer problems quickly. they are on a saturday schedule. it is the martin luther king holiday and a lot of mass transiting including muni, golden gate ferries and ac transit on the east bay, on a typical saturday or sunday schedule. we're still watching this traffic alert. one lane is still blocked northbound 880 approaching washington street. we are really not seeing much of a delay. it's because there's just not as much traffic on the roads. a lot of schools are out. no post
it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
provides. we're a civil rights office and civil right laws are not affirmative action laws and they don't say you have to do more for people with disabilities. you have to provide accommodations, particularly if requested, but because we have members who sometimes have participated on the bridge line, we have allowed that. i will get into a little bit of weeds here, we're a passive meeting body. we're not a policy-making body. the city
is that they do not. it's really an extra benefit that our office provides. we're a civil rights office and civil right laws are not affirmative action laws and they don't say you have to do more for people with disabilities. you have to provide accommodations, particularly if requested, but because we have members who sometimes have participated on the bridge line, we have allowed that. i will get into a little bit of weeds here, we're a passive meeting body. we're not a policy-making body. the city attorney of the berkeley and state- the city of berkeley fought having a bridge line for their disability council and were successful with the state. they said that having a bridge line for council members to vote is a violation of the brown act and that to have a bridge line you have to declare the individual council member's home a meeting place. that anybody from the public could go there as well, which was goofy, but that is the law. but in any case, we have that. other public bodies don't and they don't have to. >> so they are not obligated to have these phones? >> that is correct. they are n
. and they paused before this bust of the civil rights leader. the president said this was the first time he'd noticed the king bust among artifacts there and said it was a privilege to use the bible of the civil rights leader in his swearing in ceremony. >> the 24th annual martin luther king junior paradex÷(f held this morning this, is the oldest tribute to king in the east bay. the parade ended with a rally. >> people in san jose honored the late civil rights leader by hopping aboard the annual freedom train. this train ended in san francisco, coming up at 4:55 we'll have a report on other events around san francisco honoring dr. king. >> check out this video shot hours ago by sky 7 hd. that is a surfer near the cliff house. >> strong rip currents caused the surfer to lose his bearings. the coast guard first thought of air lifting him but then decided on a different approach. they told the surfer to jump into the water and jim against crashing waves to rescuers. >> shouldn't have been as far as i was with my buddy. he was a more advanced surfer. called whoever needed to call, and they ca
, gay rights, civil rights. there was a feeling in the way he framed on that platform it felt different to her. it felt different to me. that was your reaction as well? >> it felt different to me as well. we're all sitting around whether we're journalists or not. we're listening for things. from our own experiences. so when i heard the president of the united states say stonewall after saying seneca falls and selma, sort of an electric shock went through me. whoa, the president of the united states just woef in the gay rights movement with the women's rights movement and the traditional civil rights movement, but he didn't just leave it there. that would have been box checking, but in the next paragraph he talked about our gay brothers and sisters and equal treatment under the law, and that went well beyond what i think anyone even expected a president of the united states to say in an inaugural address one of their premier platforms for the american president to not only talk to the american people, but to tack to the world. while this was a domestic address, a completely agree with th
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
. >> it is a way to educate the young about the past civil rights strag rights -- struggles. and elissa harrington is there with more about how they can learn to ride the ride. >> reporter: this freedom train is to honor the birthday of martin luther king and leaves the station at 9:30. this is the 27th year that the mlk association of santa clara valley has organized this ride from san jose to san francisco. it commemorates his march from selma alabama to the dap toll of montgomery in 1965 and covers 54 miles. this is the longest running freedom train in the united states and the rides were brought about my king's wife. the freedom train today has four stops. again, it will leave san jose at 9:30 and will stop three times along the peninsula in sunnyvale, palo alto and san mateo. round trip tickets are $10 you are advised to come early because lines can get long. live in san jose, elissa harrington. cbs 5. >>> a march and parade will proceed from the caltrains depot. that will be followed by an interface commemoration ceremony. and also in san fran
control, why she is calling it an uphill battle. >> civil right heroes who impacted many lives, the asian- americans being honored today. . >>> more than 240 people are dead after flames swept through a nightclub in brazil earlier today. the club was at twice its mack. capacity. >> reporter: firefighters worked to contain a massive fire at a fight club sunday -- nightclub sunday. he says the blaze started at 2:00 a.m. after the insulation caught fire. there was a show going on when flames broke out. authorities said the cause of the fire is still under investigation. >> i would like to say to the people of our country that in this time of sadness we are all together. and we are going to over come this sadness while still in mourning. >> reporter: more than 200 people were killed. many from smoke inhalation. officials say 2,000 people urinside the club when the fire broke -- were inside the club when the fire broke out. this calls to mind other nightclub fires. 5 months ago a fire at a club in thailand killed four. one of the most memorable in the united states, 2003, a fire claimed 100 li
in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king ske.
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
to internment camps during world war ii. >> he wanted everyone to fight for their right, their civil rights to stand up for what is right. and to also to speak up when something is wrong. >> today's celebration also honored 16 other asian american and pacific islander civil rights pioneers. >>> we have some new video into the ktvu newsroom of a fatal crash. >> the red and gold well it turns to green. the rush that is on to get just the right set up in time for super bowl sunday. >> and boeing has no time to slow down. why the airplane maker is doubling its order of the 787 dream liner. you in heaven. wrapped in luxury. you in action. you in motion. you in luck. play in style. talking stick resort, scottsdale. book now to enjoy cactus league spring training rates. >>> our coverage of the 49ers quest for a sixth super bowl championship continues now with a live look at san francisco and as you can see, there it is. the team's flag is flying high near the embarcadero. >>> and that red and gold means green for some bay area retailers. >> reporter: today it seems every few minutes people would
rights and the -- religion and civil rights and they are the only state that doesn't allow gay marriage. >>> it is just a big hole in the ground now, why many say the miracle on jones street will happen again even bigger and better. >> our next question from john from baltimore. >> a priceless moment during a radio interview with jim harbaugh's mother, a surprise guest and you will hear the question that pretty much stole the show. look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems. you're only 14 and a half. he doesn't have back problems. you kids have got it too good if you ask me. [ male announcer ] now u-verse high speed internet has more speed options, reliability and ways to connect. rethink possible. >>> they call it sacred ground, serving free meals to millions of people,
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
wanted everyone to fight for their right, their civil rights to stand up for what is right. and to also to speak up when something is wrong. >> today's celebration also honored 16 other asian american and pacific islander civil rights pioneers. >>> we have some new video into the ktvu newsroom of a fatal crash. >> the red and gold well it turns to green. the rush that is on to get just the right set [ crickets chirping ] [ traffic passing ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announcing ] millions are still exposed to the dangers... of secondhand smoke... and some of them can't do anything about it. ♪ [ continues ] [ gasping ] >>> our coverage of the 49ers quest for a sixth super bowl championship continues now with a live look at san francisco and as you can see, there it is. the team's flag is flying high near the embarcadero. >>> and that red and gold means green for some bay area retailers. >> reporter: today it seems every few minutes people would come in and head back out with a new tv. perhaps it had something to d
better to look at your property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings h
and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to sa
riots in new york city which launched the gay rights movement and linked them to other civil rights struggles. and now that the work is over as you saw a few minutes ago it is party time. coming up we'll get back and give you another insider's look at some of the festivities and preparations to make it happen. >>> the first time in 18 years the 49ers are back in the super bowl. if you were around here in the mid-'90s and 1980s, you know how wild the bay area gets with 49ers fever. this time something totally new for the 49ers and the nfl. you probably know by now, sibling rivalry, two brothers coaching against each other in the super bowl. we have extensive coverage tonight of the super bowl. jim kozemore in our newsroom. we begin with arturo santiago with the family angle. >> reporter: you could say john harbaugh has had bragging rights since they beat the 49ers on thanksgiving day in 2011. now that very same sibling rivalry will be played out on an even bigger stage, the super bowl. >> i feel like there's no losing in that family. and i'm sure the brothers feel the same way. but o
about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: as the president made his exit, a pause turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> reporter: they look like so many american families do when they take in a parade. and we learned the family of the late dr. martin luther king asked the president and the chief justice sign the king family bible after the swearing in. and they did. david muir, abc news, washington. >> incredible moment when he looks back. what a scene that must be. almost a million people out there. >> i would want to take a second look as well. i want to look at you. let me get your better side. all right, okay. >>> so the inaugural observances aren't over, even at this late hour. >> our coverage continues now with abc's brandi hitt live in washington. brandi, after some glitzy galas, there are more events set for later today. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, rob. good morning, paula. that's right, the
. that he also spoke up boldly for equality, human rights, civil rights for all americans. i remember he said, and you may recall, too, mr. speaker, he said, he said, we will never forget, you know, stonewall, cynical falls and selma. these are three iconic moments in civil rights history when he talked about the women's right movement, gay rights movement and african-american movements for civilritis. but they ale added up to one thing which is that an american is an american is an american, doesn't matter what your color is, what your sex is, who you love and want to be with, what matters are that you are an american and entitled to the full protection of the law in these united states. i think it was very important for him to do so. it represented an evolutionary moment in american mystery that a president, being nag rated into his second term, -- being inaugurated into his second term, would stand up and say civil and human rights for all people. i thought it was a great moment and found myself cheering even though i hadn't planned on doing so. but he didn't stop there. he specifical
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
democratic state senator henry marsh a lifelong civil rights advocate left town to attend president obama's inauguration yesterday, the g.o.p. took advantage using their one-day majority of 20-19 to pass new redistricting lines that would create more republican-dominated districts. but in an apparent peace offering, virginia republicans did honor martin luther king as they adjourned. i'm kidding. they actually honored confederate general stonewall jackson on dr. king's holiday. tasteful. joining me now from d.c. is political reporter joe williams. and here with me in new york is the only and only sam seder host of the majority report. thank you for your time tonight to discuss all of this malfeasance. joe, let me start with you because my head hurts over this. help me out here. 41 votes to maintain a filibuster instead of 60 to break it. is that the kind of reform harry reid has been promising month after month? >> basically it is change we can believe in if you're a senator because what they want is a rule that can benefit them when they're in the minority. and that is kind of a half mea
was a veteran of the civil rights fight. double crassness to do it on the fact he's out of town attending the inraugation of the first black president. lee jackson king day, i was there. doesn't surprise me at all. what happens is you don't have a state where the consequences have to be paid for these kind of actions. you don't have a significant voting block. virginia has flipped from blue to red on the local level. not a whole lot of pushback from the democrats on the voter side until they get punished for these kind of actions it will continue. >> john: joe williams and host of ring of fire and the majority report sam seder. love talking to both of you. thank you forget for coming on. >> yet another mass shooting this time in the gun friendly state of texas. my congratulations to wayne lapierrre and the nra coming up. >> john: there was another shooting at another school today. this time in texas. at lone star college. the shooter wounded three people one critically, despite being surrounded by good guys with guns. thankfully, no one was killed. this shooting like all of the others tha
it was understood as an incredible affirmation of the humanity and civil rights of african americans. >> desegregating the public schools. >> desegregating the public schools, rejecting separate and unequal. but the truth was, it really didn't desegregate the schools even until today. roe v. wade, which was won, the whole idea of women's equality under the constitution was in its infancy. there had been almost no decisions in 1973 recognizing discrimination against women as prohibited by the constitution. roe v. wade comes down, and it's not understood as an affirmation of women's personhood, that we don't lose our human rights when we become pregnant. but almost overnight the public health situation dramatically improved, not only because women had access to legal abortion, but they didn't have to carry to term pregnancies when they weren't healthy. and so it was a dramatic change in the practicality. but what we're still very much fighting is an understanding and a respect for the fact that women, whatever their decisions are during pregnancy, remain full persons under the law. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)